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FinishedbkmgenlanpagstaAmaRevAjkwrdhglAuthor: Bookname
2.  20110827  2
rel
eng
3745* ama008ajk1188William Draper: History of the Conflict Between Religion and Science
3.  20110902 
fic
eng
7283* ama11Orhan Pamuk: Museum of innocence
5.  20111128 
eco
eng
3545* ama009ajk4100Adam Smith: Wealth of Nations
7.  20111220  1
fic
eng
5135* ama22Mark Twain: The Gilded Age
8.  20120105  2
fic
eng
2885* amaMark Twain: The Prince and the Pauper
16.  20121021  12
fic
eng
5785* ama10817Aravind Adiga: Last man in tower
20.  20121101  1
and
eng
705* ama019ajk3Kate Harper: How to make Ebook cover
23.  20130602  43
cla
eng
6665* ama010ajk4010Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club
31.  20130926  48
psy
eng
5125* ama006ajk21174Daniel Kahneman: Thinking - fast and slow
37.  20131016  1
phi
eng
4425* ama3151John William Draper: History of the Intellectual Development of Europe
39.  20131023 
phi
eng
3145* ama1Adam Smith: The Theory of Moral Sentiments (Illustrated)
43.  20140728  16
fil
eng
3105* ama014ajk144Eckhart Tolle: A New Earth
44.  20140808  11
fil
eng
2295* ama015ajk2113Eckhart Tolle: The Power of Now
45.  20140614  7
his
eng
2015* ama016ajk138Fullerton George Stuart: An Introduction to Philosophy
47.  20150125  2
nov
eng
3305* ama022ajk16397Haruki Murakami: Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage
49.  20150203  12
nov
eng
1784* ama024ajk4186Haruki Murakami: WHAT I TALK ABOUT WHEN I TALK ABOUT RUNNING
52.  20150226  1
nof
eng
55* ama027ajk8Sabrina Justison: Uncle Vanya Study Guide
54.  20150403  8
mat
eng
2445* ama028ajk5215Mario Livio:The Golden Ratio
56.  20150415  20
eco
eng
2675* ama030ajk165John Maynard Keynes:The General Theory of Employment
58.  20150430  8
bio
eng
2064* ama032ajk17169F.C. Blake: Immigrating Tears
60.  20150510  13
his
eng
5774* ama033ajk723JHingan MGirija-L.Sasikala: History of Economic Thought
63.  20150716  4
psy
eng
604* ama037ajk16Ritu Rao: The light SHIFT 21 Simple Ways to Make Your Days Interesting.
64.  20150728  13
eco
eng
10924* ama038ajk12820M.L. Jhingan: Macroeconomic Theory
65.  20150822  14
eco
eng
2865* ama03918106Ha-Joon Chang: 23 Things They Don't Tell You about Capitalism
66.  20150904  42
lit
eng
8024* ama040ajk141131Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick
25
Finished
28104.7ama
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0298Author: Bookname

Treasury of words and concepts

2 William Draper: History of the Conflict Between Religion and Science, 3 35
vituperation
vi·tu·per·a·tion n. bitter and abusive language
no one else attracted such vituperation from him.

3 Orhan Pamuk: Museum of innocence, 335 4736
gallivanting
gal·li·vant v. [intrans.] INFORMAL go around from one place to another in the pursuit of pleasure or entertainment
she quit her job to go gallivanting around the globe. early 19th cent.
perhaps an alteration of GALLANT. Page 335
crooners that

5 Adam Smith: Wealth of Nations, 275 13026
cursitor baron

5 Adam Smith: Wealth of Nations, 291 13821
tythe

5 Adam Smith: Wealth of Nations, 310 14726
tythe

5 Adam Smith: Wealth of Nations, 69 3244
fiars

7 Mark Twain: The Gilded Age, 401 8041
demands for money.

7 Mark Twain: The Gilded Age, 461 9239
supersedeas and

16 Aravind Adiga: Last man in tower, 113 1288
brinjal

16 Aravind Adiga: Last man in tower, 113 1288
pittance
pit·tance n. [usu. in sing.] a very small or inadequate amount of money paid to someone as an allowance or wage. Middle English
from Old French pitance, from medieval Latin pitantia, from Latin pietas 'pity'.

16 Aravind Adiga: Last man in tower, 118 1345
muck
muck n. dirt, rubbish, or waste matter
I'll just clean the muck off the windshield.
farmyard manure, widely used as fertilizer.
INFORMAL something regarded as worthless, sordid, or corrupt
the muck that passes for music in the pop charts.

16 Aravind Adiga: Last man in tower, 123 1402
equinox

16 Aravind Adiga: Last man in tower, 142 1619
nullah
nul·lah n. INDIAN a dry riverbed or ravine. late 18th cent.
from Hindi .

16 Aravind Adiga: Last man in tower, 150 1710
cyst
cyst n. [BIOLOGY] in an animal or plant, a thin
walled, hollow organ or cavity containing a liquid secretion; a sac, vesicle, or bladder.
[MEDICINE] in the body, a membranous sac or cavity of abnormal character containing fluid.
a tough protective capsule enclosing the larva of a parasitic worm or the resting stage of an organism. early 18th cent.
from late Latin cystis, from Greek kustis 'bladder'.

16 Aravind Adiga: Last man in tower, 156 1778
whorl
whorl n. a coil or ring, in particular

[ZOOLOGY] each of the turns or convolutions in the shell of a gastropod or ammonoid mollusk.
[BOTANY] a set of leaves, flowers, or branches springing from the stem at the same level and encircling it.
[BOTANY] (in a flower) each of the sets of organs, esp. the petals and sepals, arranged concentrically around the receptacle.
a complete circle in a fingerprint.
CHIEFLY HISTORICAL a small wheel or pulley in a spinning wheel, spinning machine, or spindle. ■ v. [intrans.] POETIC/LITERARY spiral or move in a twisted and convoluted fashion
the dances are kinetic kaleidoscopes where steps whorl into wildness. whorled adj. late Middle English (denoting a small flywheel)
apparently a variant of WHIRL, influenced by Old English wharve 'whorl of a spindle'.

16 Aravind Adiga: Last man in tower, 188 2143
wicket
wick·et n. 1 (also wick·et door or wick·et gate) a small door or gate, esp. one beside or in a larger one.
an opening in a door or wall, often fitted with glass or a grille and used for selling tickets or a similar purpose.
one of the wire hoops on a croquet course. 2 [CRICKET] each of the sets of three stumps with two bails across the top at either end of the pitch, defended by a batsman.
the prepared strip of ground between these two sets of stumps.
the dismissal of a batsman; each of ten dismissals regarded as marking a division of a side's innings
Darlington won by four wickets. □ a sticky wicket [CRICKET] a pitch that has been drying after rain and is difficult to bat on.
[in sing.] INFORMAL a tricky or awkward situation
the problem of who sits where can create a sticky wicket. □ take a wicket [CRICKET] (of a bowler or a fielding side) dismiss a batsman. Middle English (in the sense 'small door or grille')
from Anglo
Norman French and Old Northern French wiket; origin uncertain, usually referred to the Germanic root of Old Norse víkja 'to turn, move'. Cricket senses date from the late 17th cent.

16 Aravind Adiga: Last man in tower, 399 4548
brinjals

16 Aravind Adiga: Last man in tower, 64 729
gulmohar tree

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 120 3035
haughty
haugh ty / hOté/ adj. (haugh ti er, haugh ti est) arrogantly superior and disdainful
a look of haughty disdain; a haughty aristocrat. «DERIVATIVES5 haughtily /
telé/ adv. haugh ti ness n.

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 121 3060
stropping
strop /Strap/ n. a device, typically a strip of leather, for sharpening straight razors. «SPECIAL USAGE
(also strap) [NAUTICAL] a rope sling for handling cargo. ■ v. (stropped, strop ping) [trans.] sharpen on or with a strop
he stropped a knife razor
sharp on his belt. late Middle English (in the sense 'thong', also as a nautical term)
probably a West Germanic adoption of Latin stroppus 'thong'.

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 147 3718
skittle
ground

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 153 3870
buxom

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 175 4426
wagginer's,

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 176 4452
trivet
trivet / trivit/ n. an iron tripod placed over a fire for a cooking pot or kettle to stand on.
SPECIAL USAGE>
an iron bracket designed to hook onto bars of a grate for a similar purpose.

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 185 4679
shins
shin /SHlin/ n. the front of the leg below the knee. a cut of beef from the lower part of a cow's leg. ■ v. (shinned, shin ning) [intram.] (shin up down) climb quickly up or down by gripping with one's

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 195 4932
mastiff
mas tiff / mastif; n. a dog of a large, strong breed with drooping ears and pendulous lips. Middle English
obscurely representing Old French mastin. based on Latin mansiietus 'tame'.

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 204 5160
vafer.

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 208 5261
barrow
bar row 1 / barO/ n. a metal frame with two wheels used for transporting objects such as luggage. a wheelbarrow. BRIT, a two
wheeled handcart used esp. by street vendors.

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 208 5261
tantalising

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 212 5362
billeted
bil let 1 / bilit/ n. a place, usually a civilian's house or other nonmilitarv facility, where soldiers are lodged temporarily. ■ v. (
leted.
leting) [trans.] (often be billeted) lodge (soldiers) in a particular place, esp. a civilian's house or other nonmilitary facility
he didn't belong to the regiment billeted at the hotel. late Middle English (originally denoting a short written document)
from Anglo
Norman French billette, diminutive of bille (see BILL1 ). The verb is recorded in the late 16th cent., and the noun sense 'a written order requiring a householder to lodge the bearer, usually a soldier', from the mid 17th cent.; hence the current meaning.

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 212 5362
partridge
Partridges are birds in the pheasant family, Phasianidae. They are a non
migratory Old World group. These are medium
sized birds, intermediate between the larger pheasants and the smaller quails. Partridges are native to Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. Partridges are ground
nesting seed
eaters.[citation needed] (=pyy?)

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 226 5716
codger
codg er / kajer/ n. OFTEN DEROGATORY an elderly man. esp. one who is old
fashioned or eccentric
old codgers always harp on about yesteryear. mid 18th cent.
perhaps a variant of cadger (see CADGE).

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 228 5767
egress
e gress i 6 gres/ n. the action of going out of or leaving a place
direct means of access and egress for passengers.
a way out
a narrow egress.

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 237 5994
squalid
squal id / skwalid/ adj. (of a place) extremely dirty and unpleasant, esp. as a result of poverty or neglect
the squalid, overcrowded prison. showing or involving a contemptible lack of moral standards
a squalid

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 298 7537
pettitoes

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 3 76
multifarious
mul ti far i ous / ГПЭК(э) fe(9)r69S/ adj. many and of various Upes
multifarious activities. having many varied parts or aspects
a vast multifarious organization. multifar
iously adv. mul·ti·far·i·ous·ly adv. mul·ti·far·i·ous·ness n. late 16th cent.
from Latin multifarius +
OUS.

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 301 7613
ejaculated
e jac u late v. /i jakyG lat/ 1 [intrans.] (of a man or male animal) eject semen from the body at the moment of sexual climax. 2 DATED utter suddenly (a short prayer). [with direct speech] say

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 317 8018
snug
snug /sn0g/ adj. (snugger. snuggest) 1 comfortable, warm, and cozy; well protected from the weather or cold
she was safe and snug in Ruth's arms
a snug cottage. ARCHAIC (of an income or

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 322 8144
gaiters
gait·er n. (usu. gaiters) a garment similar to leggings, worn to cover or protect the ankle and lower leg.
a shoe or overshoe extending to the ankle or above.
a garment of this kind worn as part of the traditional costume of an Anglican bishop. gait·ered adj. early 18th cent.
from French guêtre, probably of Germanic origin and related to WRIST.

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 322 8144
yeomen
yeo·man n. (pl.
men) 1 HISTORICAL a man holding and cultivating a small landed estate; a freeholder. a person qualified for certain duties and rights, such as to serve on juries and vote for the knight of the shire, by virtue of possessing free land of an annual value of 40 shillings. 2 HISTORICAL a servant in a royal or noble household, ranking between a sergeant and a groom or a squire and a page. 3 BRIT. a member of the yeomanry force. 4 a petty officer in the U.S. Navy or Coast Guard performing clerical duties on board ship. (also yeo·man of sig·nals) (in the British Royal Navy and other Commonwealth navies) a petty officer concerned with signaling. yeoman service efficient or useful help in need. yeo·man·ly adj. Middle English
probably from YOUNG + MAN.

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 328 8296
goblins
gob·lin n. a mischievous, ugly, dwarflike creature of folklore. Middle English
from Old French gobelin, possibly related to German Kobold (see KOBOLD) or to Greek kobalos 'mischievous goblin'. In medieval Latin Gobelinus occurs as the name of a mischievous spirit, said to haunt Évreux in northern France in the 12th cent.

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 328 8296
wassail
was·sail ARCHAIC n. spiced ale or mulled wine drunk during celebrations for Twelfth Night and Christmas Eve. lively and noisy festivities involving the drinking of plentiful amounts of alcohol; revelry. ■ v. 1 [intrans.] drink plentiful amounts of alcohol and enjoy oneself with others in a noisy, lively way. 2 go from house to house at Christmas singing carols
here we go a
wassailing. was·sail·er n. Middle English wæs hæil 'be in (good) health!'
from Old Norse ves heill (compare with HAIL2 ). The drinking formula wassail (and the reply drinkhail 'drink good health') were probably introduced by Danish
speaking inhabitants of England, and then spread, so that by the 12th cent. the usage was considered by the Normans to be characteristic of Englishmen.

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 338 8549
plaid
plaid n. checkered or tartan twilled cloth, typically made of wool.
any cloth with a tartan pattern.
a long piece of plaid worn over the shoulder as part of Scottish Highland dress. plaid·ed adj. early 16th cent.
from Scottish Gaelic plaide 'blanket', of unknown ultimate origin.

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 341 8625
pitch
pitch 1 n. 1 the quality of a sound governed by the rate of vibrations producing it; the degree of highness or lowness of a tone
a car engine seems to change pitch downward as the vehicle passes you. a standard degree of highness or lowness used in performance
the guitars were strung and tuned to pitch. See also CONCERT PITCH. 2 the steepness of a slope, esp. of a roof.
[CLIMBING] a section of a climb, esp. a steep one.
the height to which a hawk soars before swooping on its prey. 3 [in sing.] the level of intensity of something
he brought the machine to a high pitch of development. (a pitch of) a very high degree of
rousing herself to a pitch of indignation. 4 [BASEBALL] a legal delivery of the ball by the pitcher.
(also pitch shot) [GOLF] a high approach shot onto the green.
[FOOTBALL] short for PITCHOUT sense 2. 5 BRIT. a playing field. [CRICKET] the strip of ground between the two sets of stumps. 6 a form of words used when trying to persuade someone to buy or accept something
a good sales pitch. 7 a swaying or oscillation of a ship, aircraft, or vehicle around a horizontal axis perpendicular to the direction of motion. the degree of slope or angle, as of a roof. 8 TECHNICAL the distance between successive corresponding points or lines, e.g., between the teeth of a cogwheel.
a measure of the angle of the blades of a screw propeller, equal to the distance forward a blade would move in one revolution if it exerted no thrust on the medium.

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 347 8777
saveloys
A saveloy is a type of highly seasoned sausage , usually bright red in colour, ... The saveloy's taste is similar to that of a frankfurter or ...

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 351 8878
babby
An infant (from the Latin word infans, meaning "unable to speak" or "speechless") is the very young offspring of a human. When applied to humans, the term is usually considered synonymous with baby or bairn (Scotland), but the latter is commonly applied to the young of any animal. When a human child learns to walk, the term toddler may be used instead.

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 360 9105
bannister
ban·is·ter (also ban·nis·ter) n. (also banisters) the structure formed by uprights and a handrail at the side of a staircase. a single upright at the side of the staircase
I stuck my head between the banisters. mid 17th cent.
from earlier barrister, alteration of BALUSTER.

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 366 9257
scorbutic
scor·bu·tic adj. relating to or affected with scurvy. See also ANTISCORBUTIC. mid 17th cent.
from modern Latin scorbuticus, from medieval Latin scorbutus 'scurvy', perhaps from Middle Low German (from schoren 'to break' + 'belly').

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 39 986
bustle
bus tie 1 / b9S9l/ v. [intrans.] move in an energetic or noisy manner
people clutching clipboards bustled about.
[trans.] make (someone) move hurriedly in a particular direction
she bustled us into the kitchen.
[intrans.] (of a place) be full of activity
the small harbor bustled with boats | [as adj.] (bustling) the bustling little town. ■ n. excited activity and movement
all the noise and the traffic and the bustle. late Middle English
perhaps a variant of obsolete buskle, frequentative of busk 'prepare', from Old Norse.

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 42 1062
somerset

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 47 1189
stooping. stoop 1 /stoop/ v. [intrans.] 1 bend one's head or body forward and downward
he stooped down and reached toward the coin; Linda stooped to pick up the bottles | [trans.] the man stoops his head.

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 471 11913
affidavits
af·fi·da·vit n. [LAW] a written statement confirmed by oath or affirmation, for use as evidence in court. mid 16th cent.
from medieval Latin, literally 'he has stated on oath', from affidare.

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 477 12065
turnkey
turn·key n. (pl.
keys) ARCHAIC a jailer. ■ adj. of or involving the provision of a complete product or service that is ready for immediate use
turnkey systems for telecommunications customers.

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 486 12292
chummage
After garnish, prisoners were given a "chum ticket," which told them which room was theirs. Most were expected to "chum" with other prisoners. They would often spend the first night in the infirmary until a room could be made ready, and would sometimes spend three or four nights walking around the yard before a chum could be found, though they were already being charged for the room they did not have.

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 535 13532
vixenish
vix·en n. a female fox. a spiteful or quarrelsome woman. vix·en·ish adj. late Middle English fixen, perhaps from the Old English adjective fyxen 'of a fox'. The v
is from the form of the word in southern English dialect.

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 608 15378
buxom
bux·om adj. (of a woman) plump, esp. with large breasts. bux·om·ness n.  Middle English
from the stem of Old English 'to bend' (see BOW2 ) +
SOME1 . The original sense was 'compliant, obliging', later 'lively and good
tempered', influenced by the traditional association of plumpness and good health with an easygoing nature.

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 649 16415
hordit
Most are saying that the cloud is the future. You know, the theory that you can keep all of your information online, in order to access it from any computer. Well, if you’re a believer in the cloud, then you’re going to love Hordit.com.

23 Charles Dickens: The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, 94 2378
gig
gig 1 /gig/ w. 1 CHIEFLY HISTORICAL a light two
wheeled carriage pulled by one horse. 2 a light, fast, narrow boat adapted for rowing or sailing. ■ v. [intrcms.] travel in a gig.

31 Daniel Kahneman: Thinking - fast and slow, 114 2084
WYSIATI

31 Daniel Kahneman: Thinking - fast and slow, 138 2523
botulism)

31 Daniel Kahneman: Thinking - fast and slow, 205 3748
CEO

31 Daniel Kahneman: Thinking - fast and slow, 205 3748
chief executive officer

31 Daniel Kahneman: Thinking - fast and slow, 207 3785
takautuminen

31 Daniel Kahneman: Thinking - fast and slow, 218 3986
pundits

31 Daniel Kahneman: Thinking - fast and slow, 235 4297
kouros.

31 Daniel Kahneman: Thinking - fast and slow, 237 4333
throes
throes plural n. intense or violent pain and struggle, esp. accompanying birth, death, or great change
he convulsed in his death throes. in the throes of in the middle of doing or dealing with something very difficult or painful
a friend was in the throes of a divorce. Middle English throwe (singular); perhaps related to Old English , thrawu 'calamity', influenced by 'suffer'.

31 Daniel Kahneman: Thinking - fast and slow, 260 4754
Hubris
hu·bris n. excessive pride or self
confidence. (in Greek tragedy) excessive pride toward or defiance of the gods, leading to nemesis. hu·bris·tic adj. Greek.

31 Daniel Kahneman: Thinking - fast and slow, 261 4772
CFO Chief Financing Officer? CFO

31 Daniel Kahneman: Thinking - fast and slow, 270 4936
ostensibly

31 Daniel Kahneman: Thinking - fast and slow, 298 5448
endowment
en·dow·ment n. the action of endowing something or someone
he tried to promote the endowment of a Chair of Psychiatry.
an income or form of property given or bequeathed to someone.
(usu. endowments) a quality or ability possessed or inherited by someone.
[usu. as adj.] a form of life insurance involving payment of a fixed sum to the insured person on a specified date, or to their estate should they die before this date
an endowment policy.

31 Daniel Kahneman: Thinking - fast and slow, 306 5595
overarching
o·ver·arch·ing adj. [attrib.] forming an arch over something
the overarching mangroves. comprehensive; all
embracing
a single overarching principle.

31 Daniel Kahneman: Thinking - fast and slow, 340 6216
kirnuta? churning
o·ver·arch·ing adj. [attrib.] forming an arch over something
the overarching mangroves. comprehensive; all
embracing
a single overarching principle.

31 Daniel Kahneman: Thinking - fast and slow, 343 6271
blizzard
bliz·zard n. a severe snowstorm with high winds and low visibility. FIGURATIVE an overabundance; a deluge
a blizzard of legal forms. early 19th cent. (originally U.S., denoting a violent blow)
of unknown origin.

31 Daniel Kahneman: Thinking - fast and slow, 381 6966
bliss
bliss n. perfect happiness; great joy
she gave a sigh of bliss. See note at RAPTURE.
something providing such happiness
the steam room was bliss.
a state of spiritual blessedness, typically that reached after death. bliss out [often as adj.] (blissed out) INFORMAL reach a state of perfect happiness, typically so as to be oblivious of everything else
blissed
out hippies. Old English , bliss, of Germanic origin; related to BLITHE.

31 Daniel Kahneman: Thinking - fast and slow, 406 7423
colostomy
co·los·to·my n. (pl.
mies) a surgical operation in which a piece of the colon is diverted to an artificial opening in the abdominal wall so as to bypass a damaged part of the colon. an opening so formed
[as adj.] a colostomy bag. late 19th cent.
from COLON2 + Greek stoma 'mouth'.

31 Daniel Kahneman: Thinking - fast and slow, 412 7533
obesity
o·bese adj. grossly fat or overweight. o·be·si·ty n. mid 17th cent.
from Latin obesus 'having eaten until fat', from ob
'away, completely' + esus (past participle of edere 'eat').

31 Daniel Kahneman: Thinking - fast and slow, 69 1262
Note gullibility,

37 John William Draper: History of the Intellectual Development of Europe, 168 2749
jesters

37 John William Draper: History of the Intellectual Development of Europe, 327 5362
ostensible

37 John William Draper: History of the Intellectual Development of Europe, 430 7063
infliction

44 Eckhart Tolle: The Power of Now, 172 2436
ripple.

44 Eckhart Tolle: The Power of Now, 28 449
arsonist

45 Fullerton George Stuart: An Introduction to Philosophy, 8 221
"Weltweisheit,"

47 Haruki Murakami: Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage, 14 189
nerds
nerd n. INFORMAL a foolish or contemptible person who lacks social skills or is boringly studious
one of those nerds who never asked a girl to dance. an intelligent, single
minded expert in a particular technical discipline or profession
he single
handedly changed the Zero image of the computer nerd into one of savvy Hero. nerd·ish adj. nerd·ish·ness n. nerd·y adj. 1950s
of unknown origin.

47 Haruki Murakami: Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage, 150 1739
nerd

47 Haruki Murakami: Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage, 158 1834
brooch.

47 Haruki Murakami: Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage, 163 1887
I'd like to get married.

47 Haruki Murakami: Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage, 213 2440
numb
tunnoton
Määritelmät kohteelle numb
adjektiivi
deprived of the power of sensation.
"my feet were numb with cold"
synonyymit
without sensation, without feeling, numbed, benumbed, desensitized, insensible, senseless, unfeeling, anesthetized, dazed, stunned, stupefied, paralyzed, immobilized, frozen
verbi
deprive of feeling or responsiveness.
"the cold had numbed her senses"
Katso myös
be numb, go numb
Käännökset tekstille numb
adjektiivi
tunnoton
numb, insensible, unfeeling, senseless, benumbed, dead
puutunut
numb
turta
numb
lamaantunut
numb
verbi
turruttaa
numb, stupefy, deaden
puuduttaa
numb, anaesthetize, anaesthetise
tehdä tunnottomaksi
deaden, numb
substantiivi
tönkkä
stiff, numb

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47 Haruki Murakami: Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage, 25 305
numbingly
no definition

47 Haruki Murakami: Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage, 25 308
insipid
in·sip·id adj. lacking flavor
mugs of insipid coffee. lacking vigor or interest
many artists continued to churn out insipid, shallow works. in·si·pid·i·ty n. in·sip·id·ly adv. in·sip·id·ness n. early 17th cent.
from French insipide or late Latin insipidus, from in
'not' + sapidus (see SAPID).

47 Haruki Murakami: Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage, 268 3070
She fell silent for a while. ‘So, were you able to take care of everything in Finland?*
Page 269
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47 Haruki Murakami: Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage, 289 3310
His father had smoked over fifty cigarettes a day, and had died of lung cancer.
Page 291
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47 Haruki Murakami: Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage, 3 73
gale
n. a very strong wind
it was almost blowing a gale | [as adj.] gale
force winds.
[METEOROLOGY] a wind of force 7 to 10 on the Beaufort scale (28
55 knots or 32
63 mph).
a storm at sea.
(a gale of/gales of) FIGURATIVE a burst of sound, esp. of laughter
she collapsed into gales of laughter. mid 16th cent.
perhaps related to Old Norse galinn 'mad, frantic'.

47 Haruki Murakami: Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage, 3 73
quibbling
quib·ble n. 1 a slight objection or criticism
the only quibble about this book is the price. 2 ARCHAIC a play on words; a pun. ■ v. [intrans.] argue or raise objections about a trivial matter
they are always quibbling about the amount they are prepared to pay. quib·bler n. quib·bling·ly adv. early 17th cent. (in the sense 'play on words, pun')
diminutive of obsolete quib 'a petty objection', probably from Latin quibus, dative and ablative plural of qui, quae, quod 'who, what, which', frequently used in legal documents and so associated with subtle distinctions or verbal niceties.

47 Haruki Murakami: Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage, 50 595
chinos

47 Haruki Murakami: Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage, 6 106
bragged
brag v. (bragged, brag·ging) [reporting verb] say in a boastful manner
[with direct speech] “I found them,” she bragged | [with clause] he brags that he wrote 300 pages in 10 days | [intrans.] they were bragging about how easy it had been. ■ n. 1 a gambling card game that is a simplified form of poker. 2 [in sing.] a boastful statement; an act of talking boastfully. ■ adj. [attrib.] INFORMAL, excellent; first
rate
that was my brag heifer. bragging rights used to express pride in bettering a rival
it took the team seven games to wrest bragging rights from their interstate rivals. brag·ger n. brag·ging·ly adv. Middle English (as an adjective in the sense 'boastful')
of unknown origin (French braguer is recorded only later).

47 Haruki Murakami: Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage, 6 109
pout
pout 1 v. [intrans.] push one's lips or one's bottom lip forward as an expression of petulant annoyance or in order to make oneself look sexually attractive
she lounged on the steps, pouting | [trans.] he shrugged and pouted his lips. (of a person's lips) be pushed forward in such a way
her lips pouted provocatively. ■ n. a pouting expression
his lower lip protruded in a sulky pout. pout·ing·ly adv. pout·y adj. Middle English (as a verb)
perhaps from the base of Swedish dialect puta 'be inflated'. Compare with POUT2 .

47 Haruki Murakami: Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage, 64 755
warping

47 Haruki Murakami: Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage, 8 117
pep talk
pep INFORMAL n. energy and high spirits; liveliness
he was an enthusiastic player, full of pep and fight. ■ v. (pepped, pep·ping) [trans.] (pep someone/something up) add liveliness or vigor to someone or something
measures to pep up the economy. early 20th cent.
abbreviation of PEPPER.

49 Haruki Murakami: WHAT I TALK ABOUT WHEN I TALK ABOUT RUNNING, 61 1098
beads
helmet
Page 62
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49 Haruki Murakami: WHAT I TALK ABOUT WHEN I TALK ABOUT RUNNING, 73 1314
faze
häiritä
Page 77
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49 Haruki Murakami: WHAT I TALK ABOUT WHEN I TALK ABOUT RUNNING, 87 1566
geese
Page 89
Note

49 Haruki Murakami: WHAT I TALK ABOUT WHEN I TALK ABOUT RUNNING, 89 1602
slush
loska
Page 89
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54 Mario Livio:The Golden Ratio, 118 2105
delve.

54 Mario Livio:The Golden Ratio, 119 2134
polyhedra

54 Mario Livio:The Golden Ratio, 177 3178
rhombus
suorakaide?

54 Mario Livio:The Golden Ratio, 178 3182
cosmology—the study of the universe as a whole.

54 Mario Livio:The Golden Ratio, 2 11
oxymoron
ox·y·mo·ron n. a figure of speech in which apparently contradictory terms appear in conjunction (e.g., faith unfaithful kept him falsely true). ox·y·mo·ron·ic adj. mid 17th cent.
from Greek , neuter (used as a noun) of 'pointedly foolish', from oxus 'sharp' + 'foolish'.

58 F.C. Blake: Immigrating Tears, 104 1860
bigot
Bigotry
Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bigotry
Bigotry is a state of mind where a person obstinately, irrationally, unfairly or intolerantly dislikes other people, ideas, etc. Some examples include personal ...
‎Bigot (disambiguation)
‎Purist
‎Yobaz

58 F.C. Blake: Immigrating Tears, 112 2000
A Brag Sheet to Brag About
College Confidential
www.collegeconfidential.com › Read & Learn
How do you tell a college all about the many “activities” you've done and currently do, when you're filling out your applications? This falls under the umbrella of ...

58 F.C. Blake: Immigrating Tears, 153 2729
consummate [kan'se mit, kan sum'it; for v. kan'ss mät']Use consummate in a sentenceadjectiveConsummate is define...

58 F.C. Blake: Immigrating Tears, 155 2764
Rile | Definition of rile by Merriam
Webster www.merriam
webster.corrVdictionary/rile
Käännä tä...

58 F.C. Blake: Immigrating Tears, 155 2764
riled
Riled Synonyms, Riled Antonyms | Thesaurus.com
www.thesaurus.com/browse/riled. Synonyms for riled at Thesaurus.com with free online thesaurus, antonyms, and definitions. Dictionary and Word of the Day.

58 F.C. Blake: Immigrating Tears, 156 2788
Bigotry
Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Wikipedia
app
Käännä tämä sivuBigotry is a state of mind where a person obstina...

58 F.C. Blake: Immigrating Tears, 156 2788
bigotry
Bigotry
Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bigotry
Bigotry is a state of mind where a person obstinately, irrationally, unfairly or intolerantly dislikes other people, ideas, etc. Some examples include personal ...
‎Bigot (disambiguation)
‎Purist
‎Yobaz

58 F.C. Blake: Immigrating Tears, 183 3279
indulging
Indulge an Attachment, by Roger Walsh | Awakin.org
www.awakin.org/read/view.php?tid=961
2.12.2013
Of course, indulging a craving is no guarantee of a cure. ... Just this morning I made a deliberate choice to accept the feelings of love I have in .

58 F.C. Blake: Immigrating Tears, 28 484
shards
Shards Online | A moddable online sandbox RPG
shardsonline.com/ Shards Online. Support Shards Online and get early access. Shards Online Kickstarter ... Stay up to date on everything Shards Online, including opportunities to

58 F.C. Blake: Immigrating Tears, 31 550
purview
Purview | Definition of purview by Merriam
Webster
www.merriam
webster.com/dictionary/purview
an area within which someone or something has authority, influence, or knowledge.

58 F.C. Blake: Immigrating Tears, 35 605
Infested
infested
definition of infested by The Free Dictionary
www.thefreedictionary.com/infested
tr.v. in·fest·ed, in·fest·ing, in·fests.
1. To inhabit or overrun in numbers or quantities large enough to be harmful, threatening, or obnoxious
rats infesting the ...

58 F.C. Blake: Immigrating Tears, 49 873
gutsy
definition of gutsy by The Free Dictionary
www.thefreedictionary.com/gutsy

58 F.C. Blake: Immigrating Tears, 63 1112
Serendipity
Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serendipity
Serendipity means a "fortunate happenstance" or "pleasant surprise". It was coined by Horace Walpole in 1754. In a letter he wrote to a friend Walpole explained ...
‎Serendipity (disambiguation)
‎The Three Princes of Serendip
‎Untranslatability

58 F.C. Blake: Immigrating Tears, 7 112
nondescript
non·de·script adj. lacking distinctive or interesting features or characteristics
she lived in a nondescript suburban apartment block. ■ n. a nondescript person or thing. non·de·script·ly adv. non·de·script·ness n. late 17th cent. (in the sense 'not previously described or identified scientifically')
from NON
+ obsolete descript 'described, engraved' (from Latin descriptus).

58 F.C. Blake: Immigrating Tears, 77 1368
feisty
englannista suomeksi
Sanakirja.org (englanti
suomi)
www.sanakirja.org/search.php?id=239971&l2=17
Komparatiivi, feistier. Superlatiivi, feistiest. Komparatiivi, more feisty. Superlatiivi, most feisty. Luokat. Adjektiivit · Germaanisista kantakielistä johdetut sanat .

58 F.C. Blake: Immigrating Tears, 9 144
gregarious
Gregarious | Definition of gregarious by Merriam
Webster adjective gre·gar·i·ous \gri
ˈger
ē
əs\.
enjoying the company of other people. biology
tending to live in groups. Why Do We Use Incorrigible and Not Corrigible .

58 F.C. Blake: Immigrating Tears, 93 1661
perked
perked
definition of perked by The Free Dictionary
www.thefreedictionary.com/perked
To stick up or jut out
dogs' ears that perk. 2. To carry oneself in a lively and jaunty manner. v.tr. To cause to stick up quickly
The dog perked its ears at the noise

64 M.L. Jhingan: Macroeconomic Theory, 1 1
1,,Jhingan
Macroeconomic Theory

64 M.L. Jhingan: Macroeconomic Theory, 17 297
term 'macro' was first used in economics by Ragner Frisch in 1933.

64 M.L. Jhingan: Macroeconomic Theory, 372 6671
abode
a·bode 1 n. FORMAL or POETIC/LITERARY a place of residence; a house or home
her current abode | HUMOROUS my humble abode.
residence
a place of abode.
ARCHAIC a stay; a sojourn. Middle English (in the sense 'act of waiting')
verbal noun from ABIDE.

64 M.L. Jhingan: Macroeconomic Theory, 38 662
In common parlance

64 M.L. Jhingan: Macroeconomic Theory, 595 10697
bottleneck inflation or “semi
inflation”. If

64 M.L. Jhingan: Macroeconomic Theory, 598 10747
runaway or galloping inflation.

64 M.L. Jhingan: Macroeconomic Theory, 615 11046
proft
push inflation. Oligopolist and monopolist firms raise the prices

64 M.L. Jhingan: Macroeconomic Theory, 615 11058
administered
price theory of inflation or price
push inflation or sellers’ inflation or market
power inflation.

64 M.L. Jhingan: Macroeconomic Theory, 635 11411
natural rate of unemployment.

64 M.L. Jhingan: Macroeconomic Theory, 646 11605
inflationary recession.

64 M.L. Jhingan: Macroeconomic Theory, 666 11973
Sometimes, deflation is confused with disinflation.

64 M.L. Jhingan: Macroeconomic Theory, 964 17339
shirk v. [with obj.] avoid or neglect (a duty or responsibility)
I do not shirk any responsibility in this matter. ■ n. ARCHAIC a person who shirks. shirker n. mid 17th century (in the sense ‘practise fraud or trickery’)
from obsolete shirk ‘sponger’, perhaps from German Schurke ‘scoundrel’.
pakolla

65 Ha-Joon Chang: 23 Things They Don't Tell You about Capitalism, 105 1933
SAPs
Social Aid Programs?

65 Ha-Joon Chang: 23 Things They Don't Tell You about Capitalism, 111 2044
Expressions like ‘white elephant’ or ‘castle in the desert’ were invented during this period to describe such projects.

65 Ha-Joon Chang: 23 Things They Don't Tell You about Capitalism, 112 2058
state
owned enterprise (SOE),

65 Ha-Joon Chang: 23 Things They Don't Tell You about Capitalism, 112 2065
And to cap it all,

65 Ha-Joon Chang: 23 Things They Don't Tell You about Capitalism, 140 2570
teething
kasvukipu

65 Ha-Joon Chang: 23 Things They Don't Tell You about Capitalism, 147 2710
fraudster n. BRITISH a person who commits fraud, especially in business dealings.

65 Ha-Joon Chang: 23 Things They Don't Tell You about Capitalism, 148 2722
flippancy n. [mass noun] lack of respect or seriousness; frivolousness
she was infuriated by his careless flippancy.

65 Ha-Joon Chang: 23 Things They Don't Tell You about Capitalism, 148 2722
upshot n. [in sing.] the final or eventual outcome or conclusion of a discussion, action, or series of events
the upshot of the meeting was that he was on the next plane to New York.

65 Ha-Joon Chang: 23 Things They Don't Tell You about Capitalism, 169 3113
poached by other firms ‘free
riding’ on their training efforts.

65 Ha-Joon Chang: 23 Things They Don't Tell You about Capitalism, 174 3195
‘indicative planning’. This is planning that involves the government in a capitalist country setting some broad targets concerning key economic variables

65 Ha-Joon Chang: 23 Things They Don't Tell You about Capitalism, 175 3215
state
owned enterprises (SOEs).

65 Ha-Joon Chang: 23 Things They Don't Tell You about Capitalism, 179 3303
(mas Papista que el Papa).

65 Ha-Joon Chang: 23 Things They Don't Tell You about Capitalism, 189 3490
brainiest

65 Ha-Joon Chang: 23 Things They Don't Tell You about Capitalism, 201 3697
teeter v. [no obj., usually with adverbial] move or balance unsteadily; sway back and forth
she teetered after him in her high
heeled sandals.
(often teeter between) be unable to decide between different courses; waver
she teetered between tears and anger. □ teeter on the brink (or edge) be very close to a difficult or dangerous situation. mid 19th century
variant of dialect titter, from Old Norse titra ‘shake, shiver’.

65 Ha-Joon Chang: 23 Things They Don't Tell You about Capitalism, 25 449
grail n. (the Grail or the Holy Grail) (in medieval legend) the cup or platter used by Christ at the Last Supper, and in which Joseph of Arimathea received Christ's blood at the Cross. Quests for it undertaken by medieval knights are described in versions of the Arthurian legends written from the early 13th century onward.
FIGURATIVE a thing which is eagerly pursued or sought after
the enterprise society where profit at any cost has become the holy grail. from Old French graal, from medieval Latin gradalis ‘dish’.

65 Ha-Joon Chang: 23 Things They Don't Tell You about Capitalism, 71 1306
sobriquet ‘le cost killer’

65 Ha-Joon Chang: 23 Things They Don't Tell You about Capitalism, 73 1338
CEO abbr. chief executive officer.

65 Ha-Joon Chang: 23 Things They Don't Tell You about Capitalism, 78 1431
‘‘brownfield investment,’ that is, acquisition of existing firms by a foreign firm, rather than ‘greenfield investment’, which involves a foreign firm setting up new production

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 110 1973
ea·sel n. a self
supporting wooden frame for holding an artist's work while it is being painted or drawn. a similar frame for displaying charts, promotional materials, announcements, etc. late 16th cent.
from Dutch ezel 'ass'. The word “horse” is used in English in a similar way to denote a supporting frame.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 111 1996
hogs·head (abbr.
hhd) n. a large cask.
a measure of capacity for wine, equal to 63 gallons (238.7 liters).
a measure of capacity for beer, equal to 64 gallons (245.5 liters). Middle English
from HOG + HEAD; the reason for the term is unknown.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 118 2115
bump n. 1 a light blow or a jolting collision
a nasty bump on the head.
the dull sound of such a blow or collision.
[AERONAUTICS] a rising air current causing an irregularity in an aircraft's motion. 2 a protuberance on a level surface
bumps in the road.
a swelling on the skin, esp. one caused by illness or injury.
DATED or HUMOROUS a prominence on a person's skull, formerly thought to indicate a particular mental faculty; such a faculty
he was making the most of his bump of direction. 3 a loosely woven fleeced cotton fabric used in upholstery and as lining material. ■ v. 1 [intrans.] knock or run into someone or something, typically with a jolt
I almost bumped into him | [trans.] she bumped the girl with her hip.
(bump into) meet by chance
we might just bump into each other.
[trans.] hurt or damage (something) by striking or knocking it against something else
she bumped her head on the sink.
[trans.] cause to collide with something
she went through the door, bumping the bag against it. 2 [intrans.] move or travel with much jolting and jarring
the car bumped along the rutted track. [trans.] push (something) jerkily in a specified direction
she had to bump the wheelchair down the steps. 3 [trans.] refuse (a passenger) a reserved place on an airline flight, typically because of deliberate overbooking. cause to move from a job or position, typically in favor of someone else; displace
she was bumped for a youthful model. □  bump someone off INFORMAL murder someone.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 120 2152
dregs n. the remnants of a liquid left in a container, together with any sediment or grounds
coffee dregs. FIGURATIVE the most worthless part or parts of something
the dregs of society. dreg·gy adj. Middle English
probably of Scandinavian origin and related to Swedish drägg (plural).

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 127 2282
breech·es plural n. short trousers fastened just below the knee, now chiefly worn for riding a horse or as part of ceremonial dress. INFORMAL trousers. too big for one's breeches see BIG. Middle English
plural of BREECH.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 131 2352
gaunt·let 1 n. a stout glove with a long loose wrist.
HISTORICAL an armored glove, as worn by a medieval knight.
the part of a glove covering the wrist. take up (or throw down) the gauntlet accept (or issue) a challenge. from the medieval custom of issuing a challenge by throwing one's gauntlet to the ground; whoever picked it up was deemed to have accepted the challenge. late Middle English
from Old French gantelet, diminutive of gant 'glove', of Germanic origin.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 132 2364
smirk v. [intrans.] smile in an irritatingly smug, conceited, or silly way
Dr. Ali smirked in triumph. See note at SMILE. ■ n. a smug, conceited, or silly smile
Gloria pursed her mouth in a self
satisfied smirk. smirk·er n. smirk·i·ly adv. smirk·ing·ly adv. smirk·y adj. Old English sme(a)rcian, from a base shared by SMILE. The early sense was 'to smile'; it later gained a notion of smugness or silliness.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 140 2509
sash 1 n. a long strip or loop of cloth worn over one shoulder or around the waist, esp. as part of a uniform or official dress. sashed adj. sash·less adj. late 16th cent. (earlier as shash, denoting fine fabric twisted around the head as a turban)
from Arabic 'muslin, turban'.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 144 2591
belch v. 1 [intrans.] emit gas noisily from the stomach through the mouth. 2 [trans.] (often belch out/forth/into) (esp. of a chimney) send (smoke or flames) out or up
a factory chimney belches out smoke. [intrans.] (often belch from) (of smoke or flames) pour out from a chimney or other opening
flames belch from the wreckage. ■ n. an act of belching
he gave a loud belch. Old English belcettan, probably imitative.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 157 2828
wal·low v. [intrans.] 1 (chiefly of large mammals) roll about or lie relaxed in mud or water, esp. to keep cool, avoid biting insects, or spread scent
watering places where buffalo liked to wallow. (of a boat or aircraft) roll from side to side
the small jet wallowed in the sky. 2 (wallow in) (of a person) indulge in an unrestrained way in (something that creates a pleasurable sensation)
I was wallowing in the luxury of the hotel; he had been wallowing in self
pity. ■ n. 1 an act of wallowing
a wallow in nostalgia. 2 an area of mud or shallow water where mammals go to wallow, typically developing into a depression in the ground over long use. wal·low·er n. Old English walwian 'to roll around', of Germanic origin, from an Indo
European root shared by Latin volvere 'to roll'.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 167 3008
kin·dling n. 1 easily combustible small sticks or twigs used for starting a fire. 2 (in neurology) a process by which a seizure or other brain event is both initiated and its recurrence made more likely.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 169 3032
sal·low 1 adj. (
low·er,
low·est) (of a person's face or complexion) of an unhealthy yellow or pale brown color. ■ v. [trans.] RARE make sallow. sal·low·ish adj. sal·low·ness n. Old English salo 'dusky', of Germanic origin; related to Old Norse 'yellow', from a base meaning 'dirty'.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 170 3056
gar·net n. a precious stone consisting of a deep red vitreous silicate mineral. [MINERALOGY] any of a class of silicate minerals including this, which belong to the cubic system and have the general chemical formula A3B2(SiO4)3 (A and B being respectively divalent and trivalent metals). Middle English
probably via Middle Dutch from Old French grenat, from medieval Latin granatus, perhaps from granatum (see POMEGRANATE), because the garnet is similar in color to the pulp of the fruit.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 176 3169
gawp v. [intrans.] INFORMAL stare openly in a stupid or rude manner
what are you gawping at? gawp·er n. late 17th cent.
perhaps an alteration of GAPE.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 179 3218
gull 1 n. a long
winged, web
footed seabird with a raucous call, typically having white plumage with a gray or black mantle.  Family Laridae
several genera, in particular Larus, and numerous species. late Middle English
of Celtic origin; related to Welsh gwylan and Breton gwelan.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 182 3277
prow n. the portion of a ship’s bow above water. the pointed or projecting front part of something such as a car or building. mid 16th cent.
from Old French proue, from Provençal proa, probably via Latin from Greek , from a base meaning 'in front'.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 185 3326
bag·gy adj. (
gi·er,
gi·est) (of clothing) loose and hanging in folds
baggy pants. (of eyes) with folds of puffy skin below them
his eyes were baggy with the fatigue of overwork. ■ n. (baggies) INFORMAL loose and wide
legged pants, shorts, or swim trunks. bag·gi·ly adv. bag·gi·ness n.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 186 3338
gaud·y 1 adj. (gaud·i·er, gaud·i·est) extravagantly bright or showy, typically so as to be tasteless
silver bows and gaudy ribbons. gaud·i·ly adv. gaud·i·ness n. late 15th cent.
probably from GAUD +
Y1

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 21 366
bloated,bloat·ed adj. (of part of the body) swollen with fluid or gas
he had a bloated, unshaven face.
FIGURATIVE excessive in size or amount
the company trimmed its bloated labor force.
FIGURATIVE (of a person) excessively wealthy and pampered
the bloated captains of industry.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 226 4074
ran·sack v. [trans.] go hurriedly through (a place) stealing things and causing damage
burglars ransacked her home. search through (a place or receptacle) to find something, esp. in such a way as to cause disorder and damage
Hollywood ransacks the New York stage for actors. ran·sack·er n. Middle English
from Old Norse rannsaka, from rann 'house' + a second element related to 'seek'.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 227 4086
swig INFORMAL v. (swigged , swig·ging) [trans.] drink in large gulps
Dave swigged the wine in five gulps | [intrans.] old men swigged from bottles of plum brandy. ■ n. a large draft of drink
he took a swig of tea. swig·ger n. mid 16th cent. (as a noun in the obsolete sense 'liquor')
of unknown origin.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 228 4110
slate n. 1 a fine
grained gray, green, or bluish metamorphic rock easily split into smooth, flat pieces. a flat piece of such rock used as roofing material. 2 a flat piece of slate used for writing on, typically framed in wood, formerly used in schools.
a list of candidates for election to a post or office, typically a group sharing a set of political views
another slate of candidates will be picked for the state convention.
a range of something offered
the company has revealed details of a $60 million slate of film productions.
a board showing the identifying details of a take of a motion picture, which is held in front of the camera at its beginning and end. 3 [usu. as adj.] a bluish
gray color
suits of slate gray. ■ v. [trans.] 1 cover (something, esp. a roof) with slates. 2 BRIT., INFORMAL criticize severely
his work was slated by the critics. 3 (usu. be slated) schedule; plan
renovations are slated for late June | [trans.] the former brickyard is slated to be renovated. (usu. be slated) nominate (someone) as a candidate for an office or post
I understand that I am being slated for promotion. 4 identify (a movie take) using a slate. wipe the slate clean see WIPE. slat·y adj. Middle English sclate, sklate, shortening of Old French esclate, feminine, synonymous with esclat 'piece broken off' (see SLAT). Sense 3 of the verb arose from the practice of noting a name on a writing slate.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 23 390
poof 1 (also pouf) exclam. 1 used to convey the suddenness with which someone or something disappears
once you've used it, poofit's gone. 2 used to express contemptuous dismissal
“Oh, poof!” said Will. “You say that every year.” early 19th cent.
symbolic.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 239 4304
spit·tle n. saliva, esp. as ejected from the mouth. spit·tly adj. late 15th cent.
alteration of dialect spattle, by association with SPIT1 .

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 247 4451
jape n. a practical joke
the childish jape of depositing a stink bomb in her locker. ■ v. [intrans.] say or do something in jest or mockery. jap·er·y n. Middle English
apparently combining the form of Old French japer 'to yelp, yap' with the sense of Old French gaber 'to mock'.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 254 4581
mince v. [trans.] 1 [often as adj.] (minced) cut up or grind (food, esp. meat) into very small pieces, typically in a machine with revolving blades
minced beef. 2 [intrans.] walk with an affected delicacy or fastidiousness, typically with short quick steps
there were plenty of secretaries mincing about. ■ n. something minced, esp. mincemeat
put the mince on a dish. a quantity of something minced
a mince of garlic. not mince words (or one's words) speak candidly and directly, esp. when criticizing someone or something
a gruff surgeon who does not mince words. minc·er n. minc·ing adj. (in sense 2) minc·ing·ly adv. (in sense 2). late Middle English
from Old French mincier, based on Latin minutia 'smallness'.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 256 4605
tas·sel n. a tuft of loosely hanging threads, cords, or other material knotted at one end and attached for decoration to home furnishings, clothing, or other items. the tufted head of some plants, esp. a flowerhead with prominent stamens at the top of a cornstalk. ■ v. (
seled,
sel·ing; BRIT.
selled,
sel·ling) 1 [trans.] [usu. as adj.] (tasseled) provide with a tassel or tassels
a tasseled tablecloth. 2 [intrans.] (of corn or other plants) form tassels. Middle English (also denoting a clasp for a cloak)
from Old French tassel 'clasp', of unknown origin.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 257 4630
“COCKNEY”,’ said Mr Inbelicate. ‘It now refers to working
class people of a particular district in the East End of London

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 262 4726
prussic acid

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 267 4812
spit·toon n. a metal or earthenware pot typically having a funnel
shaped top, used for spitting into.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 268 4823
gul·li·ble adj. easily persuaded to believe something; credulous
an attempt to persuade a gullible public to spend their money. gul·li·bil·i·ty n. gul·li·bly adv. early 19th cent.
from GULL2 +
IBLE.   callow, credulous, gullible, ingenuous, naive, trusting, unsophisticated Some people will believe anything. Those who are truly gullible are the easiest to deceive, which is why they so often make fools of themselves. Those who are merely credulous might be a little too quick to believe something, but they usually aren't stupid enough to act on it. Trusting suggests the same willingness to believe (a trusting child), but it isn't necessarily a bad way to be (a person so trusting he completely disarmed his enemies). No one likes to be called naive because it implies a lack of street smarts (she's so naive she'd accept a ride from a stranger), but when applied to things other than people, it can describe a simplicity and absence of artificiality that is quite charming (the naive style in which nineteenth
century American portraits were often painted). Most people would rather be thought of as ingenuous, meaning straightforward and sincere (an ingenuous confession of the truth), because it implies the simplicity of a child without the negative overtones. Callow, however, comes down a little more heavily on the side of immaturity and almost always goes hand
in
hand with youth. Whether young or old, someone who is unsophisticated lacks experience in worldly and cultural matters.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 278 5000
teth·er n. a rope or chain with which an animal is tied to restrict its movement. ■ v. [trans.] tie (an animal) with a rope or chain so as to restrict its movement
the horse had been tethered to a post. the end of one's tether see END. late Middle English
from Old Norse tjóthr, from a Germanic base meaning 'fasten'.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 278 5012
stick·le·back n. a small fish with sharp spines along its back, able to live in both salt and fresh water and found in both Eurasia and North America.  Family Gasterosteidae
several genera and species, including the common and widespread three
spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus). late Middle English
from Old English sticel 'thorn, sting' + bæc 'back'. stick·ler n. 1 a person who insists on a certain quality or type of behavior
a

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 28 488
stooped adj. (of a person) having the head and shoulders habitually bent forward
a thin, stooped figure. (of the shoulders or another part of the body) habitually bent forward
the man was slight, with stooped shoulders.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 282 5074
beau n. (pl. beaux or beaus) DATED 1 a boyfriend or male admirer. 2 a rich, fashionable young man; a dandy. late 17th cent. (sense 2)
from French, literally 'handsome', from Latin bellus.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 284 5122
de·bauch·er·y n. excessive indulgence in sensual pleasures.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 285 5135
lick·spit·tle n. a person who behaves obsequiously to those in power.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 31 536
ew·er n. a large jug with a wide mouth, formerly used for carrying water for someone to wash in. late Middle English
from Anglo
Norman French ewer, variant of Old French aiguiere, based on Latin aquarius 'of water', from aqua 'water'.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 315 5684
af·fi·da·vit n. [LAW] a written statement confirmed by oath or affirmation, for use as evidence in court. mid 16th cent.
from medieval Latin, literally 'he has stated on oath', from affidare.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 320 5767
co·nun·drum n. (pl.
drums) a confusing and difficult problem or question
one of the most difficult conundrums for the experts. a question asked for amusement, typically one with a pun in its answer; a riddle. See note at RIDDLE. late 16th cent.
of unknown origin, but first recorded in a work by Thomas Nashe, as a term of abuse for a crank or pedant, later coming to denote a whim or fancy, also a pun. Current senses date from the late 17th cent.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 341 6144
bludg·eon n. a thick stick with a heavy end, used as a weapon
FIGURATIVE a rhetorical bludgeon in the war against liberalism. ■ v. [trans.] beat (someone) repeatedly with a bludgeon or other heavy object.
force or bully (someone) to do something
she was determined not to be bludgeoned into submission.
(bludgeon one's way) make one's way by brute force. mid 18th cent.
of unknown origin.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 343 6180
gash n. 1 a long deep slash, cut, or wound
a bad gash in one leg became infected. a cleft made as if by a slashing cut
the blast ripped a 25
foot gash in the hull. 2 VULGAR SLANG the vulva. OFFENSIVE women collectively regarded in sexual terms. ■ v. [trans.] make a gash in; cut deeply
the jagged edges gashed their fingers. Middle English garse, from Old French garcer 'to chap, crack', perhaps based on Greek kharassein 'sharpen, scratch, engrave'. The current spelling is recorded from the mid 16th cent.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 350 6314
jest·er n. HISTORICAL a professional joker or “fool” at a medieval court, typically wearing a cap with bells on it and carrying a mock scepter. a person who habitually plays the fool.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 357 6432
quill
sulka

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 362 6533
loathed!
inhottu

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 374 6746
shrug
v. (shrugs, shrugging, shrugged) [with obj.] raise (one's shoulders) slightly and momentarily to express doubt, ignorance, or indifference
Jimmy looked enquiringly at Pete, who shrugged his shoulders | [no obj.] he just shrugged and didn't look interested.
(shrug something off) dismiss something as unimportant
the managing director shrugged off the criticism.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 380 6845
twaddle
hölynpölyä

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 383 6906
stickleback n. a small fish with sharp spines along its back, able to live in both salt and fresh water and found in both Eurasia and North America. Family Gasterosteidae
several genera and species, including the common and widespread three
spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus). late Middle English
from Old English sticel ‘thorn, sting’ + bæc ‘back’.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 385 6934
coot
n. 1 (pl. same) an aquatic bird of the rail family, with blackish plumage, lobed feet, and a bill that extends back on to the forehead as a horny shield. Genus Fulica, family Rallidae
several species, in particular the widespread F. atra, which has a white bill and frontal shield. 2 (usually old coot) INFORMAL a stupid or eccentric person, typically an old man. Middle English
probably of Dutch or Low German origin and related to Dutch koet.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 390 7024
binge INFORMAL n. a period of excessive indulgence in an activity, especially drinking alcohol
he went on a binge and was in no shape to drive | [as modifier] binge drinking. ■ v. (binges, bingeing or US also binging, binged) [no obj.] indulge in an activity, especially eating, to excess
she binged on ice cream. binger n. mid 19th century
from English dialect binge ‘to soak a wooden vessel’.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 390 7024
taut adj. stretched or pulled tight; not slack
the fabric stays taut without adhesive.
(especially of muscles or nerves) tense; not relaxed.
(of writing, music, etc.) concise and controlled
a taut text of only a hundred and twenty pages.
(of a ship) having a disciplined and efficient crew. tauten v. tautly adv. tautness n. Middle English tought ‘distended’, perhaps originally a variant of TOUGH.
kireällä

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 390 7025
gullible adj. easily persuaded to believe something; credulous
an attempt to persuade a gullible public to spend their money. gullibility n. gullibly adv. early 19th century
from GULL2 +
IBLE. Gullibility is a failure of social intelligence in which a person is easily tricked or manipulated into an ill
advised course of action. It is closely related to credulity, which is the tendency to believe unlikely propositions that are unsupported by evidence.[1][2] Classes of people especially vulnerable to exploitation due to gullibility include children, the elderly, and the developmentally disabled.[2]

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 394 7104
hemlock n. 1 a highly poisonous European plant of the parsley family, with a purple
spotted stem, fern
like leaves, small white flowers, and an unpleasant smell. Conium maculatum, family Umbelliferae.
[mass noun] a sedative or poisonous potion obtained from the hemlock. 2 (also hemlock fir or spruce) a coniferous North American tree with dark green foliage which is said to smell like hemlock when crushed, grown chiefly for timber. Genus Tsuga, family Pinaceae
several species. Old English hymlice, hemlic, of unknown origin.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 395 7121
banter n. [mass noun] the playful and friendly exchange of teasing remarks
there was much good
natured banter. ■ v. [no obj.] exchange remarks in a good
humoured teasing way
the men bantered with the waitresses | (as adj. bantering) a bantering tone. banterer n. banteringly adv. late 17th century
of unknown origin.
pilailu

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 400 7220
being especially roseate at the nose.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 402 7244
aslant adv. at an angle or in a sloping direction
some of the paintings hung aslant. ■ prep. across (something) at an angle.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 41 718
o·gle v. [trans.] stare at in a lecherous manner
he was ogling her breasts | [intrans.] men who had turned up to ogle. ■ n. a lecherous look. o·gler n. late 17th cent.
probably from Low German or Dutch; compare with Low German oegeln, frequentative of oegen 'look at'.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 410 7385
Lothario /lə θε r ə
θα
/ n. (pl. Lotharios) a man who behaves selfishly and irresponsibly in his sexual relationships with women. from a character in Rowe's Fair Penitent (1703).

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 411 7418
cloak n. 1 a sleeveless outdoor overgarment that hangs loosely from the shoulders.
something serving to hide or disguise something
preparations had taken place under a cloak of secrecy. 2 (cloaks) BRITISH a cloakroom. ■ v. [with obj.] dress in a cloak
they sat cloaked and hooded.
hide, cover, or disguise (something)
she cloaked her embarrassment by rushing into speech. Middle English
from Old French cloke, dialect variant of cloche ‘bell, cloak’ (from its bell shape), from medieval Latin clocca ‘bell’. Compare with clock
1.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 414 7457
gaiter n. (usually gaiters) a protective covering of cloth or leather for the ankle and lower leg.
chiefly US a shoe or overshoe extending to the ankle or above.
a flexible covering for the base of a gear lever or other mechanical part. gaitered adj. early 18th century
from French guêtre, probably of Germanic origin and related to WRIST.
säärystimet

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 421 7591
caper1 v. [no obj., with adverbial of direction] skip or dance about in a lively or playful way
children were capering about the room. ■ n. 1 a playful skipping movement
she did a little caper or dance. 2 INFORMAL an illicit or ridiculous activity or escapade
I'm too old for this kind of caper.
a light
hearted, far
fetched film, especially about crime
a cop caper about intergalactic drug dealers. □ cut a caper make a playful skipping movement. caperer n. late 16th century
abbreviation of CAPRIOLE.
Kapris

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 426 7680
shroud n. 1 a length of cloth or an enveloping garment in which a dead person is wrapped for burial
he was buried in a linen shroud.
FIGURATIVE a thing that envelops or obscures something
a shroud of mist | they operate behind a shroud of secrecy.
TECHNICAL a protective casing or cover. 2 (shrouds) a set of ropes forming part of the standing rigging of a sailing boat and supporting the mast or topmast.
(also shroud line) each of the lines joining the canopy of a parachute to the harness. ■ v. [with obj.] wrap or dress (a body) in a shroud for burial.
FIGURATIVE cover or envelop so as to conceal from view
mountains shrouded by cloud | the mystery which shrouds the origins of the universe. late Old English scrūd ‘garment, clothing’, of Germanic origin, from a base meaning ‘cut’; related to SHRED. An early sense of the verb (Middle English) was ‘cover so as to protect’.
suojus

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 426 7691
composing

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 435 7846
squalid adj. (of a place) extremely dirty and unpleasant, especially as a result of poverty or neglect
the squalid, overcrowded prison.
showing or involving a contemptible lack of moral standards
a squalid attempt to save themselves from electoral embarrassment. squalidly adv. squalidness n. late 16th century
from Latin squalidus, from squalere ‘be rough or dirty’.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 454 8184
letterpress n. [mass noun] 1 printing from a hard raised image under pressure, using viscous ink. 2 BRITISH printed text as opposed to illustrations.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 466 8402
emolument / m lj m(ə)nt ε
/ n. (usually emoluments) FORMAL a salary, fee, or profit from employment or office
the directors' emoluments. late Middle English
from Latin emolumentum, originally probably ‘payment to a miller for grinding corn’, from emolere ‘grind up’, from e
(variant of ex
) ‘out, thoroughly’ + molere ‘grind’.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 469 8461
obsequious /əb si kw əs/ adj. obedient or attentive to an excessive or servile degree
they were served by obsequious waiters. obsequiously adv. obsequiousness n. late 15th century (not depreciatory in sense in early use)
from Latin obsequiosus, from obsequium ‘compliance’, from obsequi ‘follow, comply with’.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 470 8478
gargle v. [no obj.] wash one's mouth and throat with a liquid that is kept in motion by breathing through it with a gurgling sound
he gargled with alcohol for toothache. ■ n. an act or the sound of gargling
a swig and gargle of mouthwash.
[usually in sing.] a liquid used for gargling.
British INFORMAL an alcoholic drink. early 16th century
from French gargouiller ‘gurgle, bubble’, from gargouille ‘throat’ (see GARGOYLE).

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 471 8503
baize /be z/ n. [mass noun] a coarse felt
like woollen material that is typically green, used for covering billiard and card tables and for aprons. late 16th century
from French baies, feminine plural of bai ‘chestnut
coloured’ (see bay4), treated as a singular noun. The name is presumably from the original colour of the cloth, although several colours are recorded.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 477 8612
pun1 n. a joke exploiting the different possible meanings of a word or the fact that there are words which sound alike but have different meanings. ■ v. (puns, punning, punned) [no obj.] (often as adj. punning) make a pun. punningly adv. punster n. mid 17th century
perhaps an abbreviation of obsolete pundigrion, as a fanciful alteration of PUNCTILIO.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 48 856
foi·ble n. 1 a minor weakness or eccentricity in someone's character
they have to tolerate each other's little foibles. See note at FAULT. 2 [FENCING] the weaker part of a sword blade, from the middle to the point. Compare with FORTE1 . late 16th cent. (as an adjective in the sense 'feeble')
from obsolete French, in Old French fieble (see FEEBLE). Both noun senses also formerly occurred as senses of the word feeble and all date from the 17th cent.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 481 8678
scurf n. [mass noun] flakes on the surface of the skin that form as fresh skin develops below, occurring especially as dandruff.
a flaky deposit on a plant resulting from a fungal infection. scurfy adj. late Old English sceorf, from the base of sceorfan ‘gnaw’, sceorfian ‘cut to shreds’.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 484 8730
racket1 (also racquet) n. a bat with a round or oval frame strung with catgut, nylon, etc., used especially in tennis, badminton, and squash
a squash racket.
chiefly NORTH AMERICAN a snowshoe resembling a racket. early 16th century
from French raquette (see RACKETS).

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 484 8738
chum1 INFORMAL n. 1 a close friend. 2 used as a friendly or familiar form of address between men or boys
it's your own fault, chum. ■ v. (chums, chumming, chummed) [no obj.] form a friendship with someone
his sister chummed up with Sally.
[with obj.] SCOTTISH accompany (someone) somewhere
I'll chum you down the road. late 17th century (originally Oxford University slang, denoting a room
mate)
probably short for chamber
fellow. Compare with COMRADE and CRONY.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 496 8940
foible / f b(ə)l/ n. 1 a minor weakness or eccentricity in someone's character
they have to tolerate each other's little foibles. 2 [FENCING] the part of a sword blade from the middle to the point. Compare with forte
1. late 16th century (as an adjective in the sense ‘feeble’)
from obsolete French, in Old French fieble (see FEEBLE). Both noun senses also formerly occurred as senses of the word feeble and all date from the 17th cent.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 498 8987
coat
collar
raising day

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 50 881
pin·a·fore n. a sleeveless apronlike garment worn over a child’s dress.
a collarless sleeveless dress, tied or buttoned in the back and typically worn as a jumper, over a blouse or sweater.
BRIT. a woman's loose sleeveless garment, typically full length and worn over clothes to keep them clean. late 18th cent.
from PIN + AFORE (because the term originally denoted an apron with a bib pinned on the front of a dress).

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 504 9095
cosmogony /k z m əni/ n. (pl. cosmogonies) [mass noun] the branch of science that deals with the origin of the universe, especially the solar system.
[count noun] a theory regarding the origin of the universe
in their cosmogony, the world was thought to be a square, flat surface. cosmogonic /
mə n k/ adj. cosmogonical /
mə n k(ə)l/ adj. cosmogonist n. late 17th century
from Greek kosmogonia, from kosmos ‘order or world’ +
gonia ‘
begetting’.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 509 9189
flense /flεns/ (also flench /flεn(t) /) v. [with obj.] slice the skin or fat from (a carcass, especially that of a whale).
strip (skin or fat) from a carcass
the skin had been flensed off. flenser n. early 19th century
from Danish flensa.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 514 9270
stone
4 (pl. same) BRITISH a unit of weight equal to 14 lb (6.35 kg)
I weighed 10 stone.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 535 9656
He rammed down with the ramrod
ramrod n. 1 a rod for ramming down the charge of a muzzle
loading firearm.
used in similes and metaphors to describe an erect or rigid posture
he held himself ramrod straight. 2 NORTH AMERICAN a foreman or manager, especially one who is a strict disciplinarian. ■ v. (ramrods, ramrodding, ramrodded) [with obj.] (ramrod something through) chiefly NORTH AMERICAN force a proposed measure to be accepted or completed quickly
they ramrodded through legislation voiding the court injunctions.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 54 952
cal·i·co n. (pl.
coes or
cos) printed cotton fabric
[as adj.] a calico dress. BRIT. a type of cotton cloth, typically plain white or unbleached. ■ adj. (of an animal, typically a cat) multicolored or mottled. mid 16th cent. (originally also calicut)
alteration of CALICUT, where the fabric originated.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 547 9867
tithe /t / n. one tenth of annual produce or earnings, formerly taken as a tax for the support of the Church and clergy.
(in certain religious denominations) a tenth of an individual's income pledged to the Church.
[in sing.] ARCHAIC a tenth of a specified thing
he hadn't said a tithe of the prayers he knew. ■ v. [with obj.] pay or give as a tithe
he tithes 10 per cent of his income to the Church.
HISTORICAL subject to a tax of one tenth of income or produce. tithable adj. Old English tēotha (adjective in the ordinal sense ‘tenth’, used in a specialized sense as a noun), tēothian (verb).

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 548 9892
Etching
is traditionally the process of using strong acid or mordant to cut into the unprotected parts of a metal surface to create a design in intaglio (relief) in the metal.[1] In modern manufacturing, other chemicals may be used on other types of material. As a method of printmaking, it is, along with engraving, the most important technique for old master prints, and remains in wide use today.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 568 10244
burin / bj ər n/ n. a hand
held steel tool used for engraving in metal or wood.
[ARCHAEOLOGY] a flint tool with a chisel point. mid 17th century
from French; perhaps related to Old High German bora ‘boring tool’.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 57 1010
shears (also a pair of shears) plural n. a cutting instrument in which two blades move past each other, like scissors but typically larger
garden shears. Old English (plural) 'scissors, cutting instrument', of Germanic origin; related to Dutch schaar and German Schere, also to SHEAR.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 577 10411
pimples
näppylöitä

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 586 10566
riotous laughter.
riehakas nauru

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 586 10567
profligate
tuhlaileva

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 588 10611
cockade /k ke d/ n. a rosette or knot of ribbons worn in a hat as a badge of office, or as part of a livery. cockaded adj. mid 17th century
from French cocarde, originally in bonnet à la coquarde, from the feminine of obsolete coquard ‘saucy’.cockade /k ke d/ n. a rosette or knot of ribbons worn in a hat as a badge of office, or as part of a livery. cockaded adj. mid 17th century
from French cocarde, originally in bonnet à la coquarde, from the feminine of obsolete coquard ‘saucy’.
ruusu laissa

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 59 1058
pe·o·ny n. a herbaceous or shrubby plant of north temperate regions, which has long been cultivated for its showy flowers.  Genus Paeonia, family Paeoniaceae. Old English peonie, via Latin from Greek , from , the name of the physician of the gods.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 590 10655
tankard
tankard n. a tall beer mug, typically made of silver or pewter, with a handle and sometimes a hinged lid.
the contents of or an amount held by a tankard
I've downed a tankard of ale. Middle English (denoting a large tub for carrying liquid)
perhaps related to Dutch tanckaert.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 604 10894
gaiters,
säärystimet

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 609 10995
prank
kepponen

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 612 11048
wassail / w se l w s(ə)l wa
/ ARCHAIC n. [mass noun] spiced ale or mulled wine drunk during celebrations for Twelfth Night and Christmas Eve.
lively and noisy festivities involving the drinking of plentiful amounts of alcohol; revelry. ■ v. [no obj.] 1 drink plentiful amounts of alcohol and enjoy oneself with others in a noisy, lively way.
[with obj.] HISTORICAL (in SW England) drink to (fruit trees, typically apple trees) in a custom intended to ensure a fruitful crop. 2 go from house to house at Christmas singing carols
here we go a
wassailing. wassailer n. Middle English wæs hæil ‘be in (good) health!’
from Old Norse ves heill (compare with hail2). The drinking formula wassail (and the reply drinkhail ‘drink good health’) were probably introduced by Danish
speaking inhabitants of England, and then spread, so that by the 12th century the usage was considered by the Normans to be characteristic of Englishmen.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 62 1106
bel·lows plural n. [also treated as sing.] 1 a device with a bag that emits a stream of air when squeezed

(also pair of bellows) a kind with two handles used for blowing air at a fire.
a kind used in a harmonium or small organ. 2 an object or device with concertinaed sides to allow it to expand and contract, such as a tube joining a lens to a camera body. Middle English
probably representing Old English belga, plural of belig (see BELLY), used as a shortened form of earlier 'blowing bag'.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 621 11201
splutter v. [no obj.] make a series of short explosive spitting or choking sounds
she coughed and spluttered, tears coursing down her face.
[reporting v.] say something rapidly, indistinctly, and with a spitting sound, as a result of anger, embarrassment, or another strong emotion
[with obj.] he began to splutter excuses | [with direct speech] ‘How dare you?’ she spluttered.
[with obj.] spit (something) out from one's mouth noisily and in small splashes
spluttering brackish water, he struggled to regain his feet. ■ n. a short explosive spitting or choking noise. splutterer n. spluttering adj. splutteringly adv. late 17th century
imitative; compare with SPUTTER.
siinä

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wager n. & v. more formal term for BET. Middle English (also in the sense ‘solemn pledge’)
from Anglo
Norman French wageure, from wager ‘to wage’.
veto

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 625 11277
despicable /d sp kəb(ə)l dεsp k
/ adj. deserving hatred and contempt
a despicable crime. despicably adv. mid 16th century
from late Latin despicabilis, from despicari ‘look down on’.
halveksittava

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 630 11365
emolument / m lj m(ə)nt ε
/ n. (usually emoluments) FORMAL a salary, fee, or profit from employment or office
the directors' emoluments. late Middle English
from Latin emolumentum, originally probably ‘payment to a miller for grinding corn’, from emolere ‘grind up’, from e
(variant of ex
) ‘out, thoroughly’ + molere ‘grind’.
maksu?

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 638 11515
japan n. [mass noun] a hard, dark, enamel
like varnish containing asphalt, used to give a black gloss to metal objects.
a kind of varnish in which pigments are ground, typically used to imitate lacquer on wood.
articles made in a Japanese style, especially when decorated with lacquer or enamel
like varnish. ■ v. (japans, japanning, japanned) [with obj.] cover (something) with a hard black varnish
(as adj. japanned) a japanned tin tray. late 17th century
from JAPAN.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 649 11710
if need be, if

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 65 1154
cow·slip n. 1 a European primula with clusters of drooping fragrant yellow flowers in spring, growing on dry grassy banks and in pasture.  Primula veris, family Primulaceae. 2 any of a number of herbaceous plants, in particular
 
another term for MARSH MARIGOLD.
(also Virginia bluebell) a North American plant with blue flowers (Mertensia virginica, family Boraginaceae). Old English , from 'cow' + slipa, slyppe 'slime', i.e., cow slobber or dung.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 655 11821
exacerbate / zasəbe t εk sas
/ v. [with obj.] make (a problem, bad situation, or negative feeling) worse
rising inflation was exacerbated by the collapse of oil prices. exacerbation n. mid 17th century
from Latin exacerbat
‘made harsh’, from the verb exacerbare, from ex
(expressing inducement of a state) + acerbus ‘harsh, bitter’. The noun exacerbation (late Middle English) originally meant ‘provocation to anger’.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 660 11918
satchel n. a bag carried on the shoulder by a long strap and closed by a flap, used especially for school books. Middle English
from Old French sachel, from Latin saccellus ‘small bag’.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 665 12008
Shortshanks was illustrating Longshanks. So, in the crib I was sometimes called Tinyshanks.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 668 12063
hovel n. 1 a small squalid or simply constructed dwelling.
ARCHAIC an open shed or outhouse, used for sheltering cattle or storing grain or tools. 2 HISTORICAL a conical building enclosing a kiln. late Middle English
of unknown origin.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 670 12089
mallard n. (pl. same or mallards) the commonest duck of the northern hemisphere, the male having a dark green head and white collar. Anas platyrhynchos, family Anatidae. Middle English
from Old French, ‘wild drake’, from masle ‘male’.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 672 12127
hustings n. (pl. same) a meeting at which candidates in an election address potential voters.
(the hustings) the campaigning associated with an election
I was out on the hustings, talking to people. late Old English husting ‘deliberative assembly, council’, from Old Norse hústhing ‘household assembly held by a leader’, from hús ‘house’ + thing ‘assembly, parliament’; hustings was applied in Middle English to the highest court of the City of London, presided over by the Recorder of London. Subsequently it denoted the platform in Guildhall where the Lord Mayor and aldermen presided, and (early 18th century) a temporary platform on which parliamentary candidates were nominated; hence the sense ‘electoral proceedings’.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 679 12249
purr v. [no obj.] (of a cat) make a low continuous vibratory sound expressing contentment.
[no obj., with adverbial of direction] (of a vehicle or engine) move smoothly while making a similar sound
a sleek blue BMW purred past him.
speak in a low, soft voice, especially when expressing contentment or acting seductively
[with direct speech] ‘Would you like a coffee?’ she purred. ■ n. a purring sound. early 17th century
imitative.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 680 12275
swathe1 /swe / (chiefly NORTH AMERICAN also swath /swe sw θ/) n. (pl. swathes /swe z/ or swaths /swe z sw θs/) 1 a row or line of grass, corn, or other crop as it falls or lies when mown or reaped.
a strip left clear by the passage of a mowing machine or scythe
the combine had cut a deep swathe around the border of the fields. 2 a broad strip or area of something
vast swathes of countryside | FIGURATIVE a significant swathe of popular opinion.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 685 12364
letterpress n. [mass noun] 1 printing from a hard raised image under pressure, using viscous ink. 2 BRITISH printed text as opposed to illustrations.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 691 12466
harridan / har d(ə)n/ n. a strict, bossy, or belligerent old woman
a bullying old harridan. late 17th century (originally slang)
perhaps from French haridelle ‘old horse’.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 693 12515
vatloads.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 698 12602
retch v. [no obj.] make the sound and movement of vomiting.
[with obj.] vomit. ■ n. a movement or sound of vomiting. mid 19th century
variant of dialect reach, from a Germanic base meaning ‘spittle’.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 699 12612
hitch v. 1 [with obj., and adverbial of direction] move (something) into a different position with a jerk
she hitched up her skirt and ran. 2 [no obj.] INFORMAL travel by hitch
hiking
they hitched to Birmingham.
[with obj.] obtain (a lift) by hitch
hiking. 3 [with obj.] fasten or tether
he returned to where he had hitched his horse.
harness (a draught animal or team)
Thomas hitched the pony to his cart. ■ n. 1 a temporary difficulty or problem
everything went without a hitch. 2 a knot of a particular kind, typically one used for fastening a rope to something else.
NORTH AMERICAN a device for attaching one thing to another, especially the tow bar of a motor vehicle. 3 INFORMAL an act of hitch
hiking. 4 NORTH AMERICAN INFORMAL a period of service
his 12
year hitch in the navy.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 701 12654
shown in the frontispiece of a twopenny

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 709 12806
frayed,frayed adj. (of a fabric, rope, or cord) unravelled or worn at the edge
the frayed collar of her old coat.
FIGURATIVE (of a person's nerves or temper) showing the effects of strain
an effort to soothe frayed nerves.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 712 12818
unkempt / n kεm(p)t/ adj. (especially of a person) having an untidy or dishevelled appearance
they were unwashed and unkempt. unkemptly adv. unkemptness n. late Middle English
from UN
1 ‘not’ + kempt ‘combed’ (past participle of archaic kemb, related to COMB).

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 714 12894
thickset adj. (of a person or animal) heavily or solidly built; stocky.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 716 12918
matey, tuttavallisemmin

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 716 12930
longbow n. a large bow drawn by hand and shooting a long feathered arrow. It was the chief weapon of English armies from the 14th century until the introduction of firearms.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 717 12941
titillate / t t le t/ v. [with obj.] arouse (someone) to interest or mild excitement, especially through sexually suggestive images or words
the press are paid to titillate the public.
ARCHAIC lightly touch; tickle. titillation n. early 17th century (earlier (Middle English) as titillation)
from Latin titillat
‘tickled’, from the verb titillare.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 726 13113
nimble adj. (nimbler, nimblest) quick and light in movement or action; agile
with a deft motion of her nimble fingers.
(of the mind) able to think and understand quickly. Old English n mel ‘quick to seize or comprehend’, related to niman ‘take’, of Germanic origin. The
b
was added for ease of pronunciation.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 733 13238
Yet Dickens had the gall to say

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 736 13282
cog1 n. a wheel or bar with a series of projections on its edge, which transfers motion by engaging with projections on another wheel or bar
FIGURATIVE she was only a very small cog in a big machine.
each of such a series of projections. cogged adj. Middle English
probably of Scandinavian origin and related to Swedish kugge and Norwegian kug.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 738 13326
maypole n. a painted pole, decorated with flowers, round which people traditionally dance on May Day holding long ribbons attached to the top.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 74 1326
brim n. the projecting edge around the bottom of a hat
a soft hat with a turned
up brim. See note at BORDER. the upper edge or lip of a cup, bowl, or other container
tankards frothing to the brim. ■ v. (brimmed, brim·ming) [often as adj.] (brimming) fill or be full to the point of overflowing
[intrans.] a brimming cup; | [trans.] seawater brimmed the riverbanks.
fill something so completely as almost to spill out of it
large tears brimmed in her eyes.
FIGURATIVE be possessed by or full of feelings or thoughts
he is brimming with ideas. brimmed adj. [in combination]
a wide
brimmed hat. brim·less adj. Middle English (denoting the edge of the sea or other body of water)
perhaps related to German Bräme 'trimming'.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 741 13378
lacerating lacerate / lasəre t/ v. [with obj.] tear or deeply cut (something, especially flesh or skin)
the point had lacerated his neck | (as adj. lacerated) his badly lacerated hands and knees. late Middle English
from Latin lacerat
‘mangled’, from the verb lacerare, from lacer ‘mangled, torn’.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 743 13408
hoax n. a humorous or malicious deception
the evidence had been planted as part of an elaborate hoax | [as modifier] a hoax 999 call. ■ v. [with obj.] trick or deceive (someone). late 18th century (as a verb)
probably a contraction of HOCUS.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 743 13418
hobble v. 1 [no obj., with adverbial of direction] walk in an awkward way, typically because of pain from an injury
he was hobbling around on crutches.
[with obj.] cause (a person or animal) to limp
Johnson was still hobbled slightly by an ankle injury. 2 [with obj.] tie or strap together (the legs of a horse or other animal) to prevent it from straying. [ variant of HOPPLE.]
restrict the activity or development of
the economy was hobbled by rising oil prices. ■ n. 1 [in sing.] an awkward way of walking, typically due to pain from an injury
he finished the match almost reduced to a hobble. 2 a rope or strap used for hobbling a horse or other animal.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 755 13632
swarry

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 76 1350
stag n. 1 a male deer.
[usu. as adj.] a social gathering attended by men only
a stag event.
a person who attends a social gathering unaccompanied by a partner. 2 BRIT. [STOCK MARKET] a person who applies for shares in a new issue with a view to selling at once for a profit. ■ adv. without a partner at a social gathering
a lot of boys went stag. Middle English (as a noun)
related to Old Norse steggr 'male bird', Icelandic steggi 'tomcat'.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 774 13967
raucous / r kəs/ adj. making or constituting a disturbingly harsh and loud noise
raucous youths. raucously adv. raucousness n. mid 18th century
from Latin raucus ‘hoarse’ +
OUS.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 78 1387
hol·ler INFORMAL v. [intrans.] (of a person) give a loud shout or cry
he hollers when he wants feeding | [with direct speech] “I can't get down,” she hollered. ■ n. a loud cry or shout. (also field holler) a melodic cry with abrupt or swooping changes of pitch, used originally by black slaves at work in the fields and later contributing to the development of the blues. late 17th cent. (as a verb)
variant of the rare verb hollo; related to HALLOO.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 79 1412
heif·er n. a young female cow that has not borne a calf. Old English heahfore, of unknown origin.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 80 1436
gam·mon 1 n. ham that has been cured or smoked like bacon. the bottom piece of a side of bacon, including a hind leg. late 15th cent. (denoting the haunch of a pig)
from Old Northern French gambon, from gambe 'leg'.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 801 14462
chatter v. [no obj.] talk informally about unimportant matters
she was chattering about her holiday.
(of a bird, monkey, or machine) make a series of short, quick high
pitched sounds.
(of a person's teeth) click repeatedly together from cold or fear. ■ n. [mass noun] informal talk
he was full of inconsequential but amusing chatter.
a series of short, quick high
pitched sounds
the starlings' constant chatter.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 802 14483
denizen / dεn z(ə)n/ n. FORMAL or HUMOROUS a person, animal, or plant that lives or is found in a particular place
denizens of field and forest.
British HISTORICAL a foreigner allowed certain rights in their adopted country. denizenship n. late Middle English deynseyn, via Anglo
Norman French from Old French deinz ‘within’ (from Latin de ‘from’ + intus ‘within’) +
ein (from Latin
aneus ‘
aneous’). The change in the form of the word was due to association with CITIZEN.

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 93 1663
walked in the swinging
leg manner

66 Stephen Jarvis: Death and Mr Pickwick, 97 1735
barn·storm v. [intrans.] tour rural districts giving theatrical performances, originally often in barns.
[trans.] make a rapid tour of (an area), typically as part of a political campaign.
travel around giving exhibitions of flying and performing aeronautical stunts
[as n.] (barnstorming) barnstorming had become a popular occupation among many trained pilots. barn·storm·er n.


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